In Byrmania

latimes:

Google presents global time-lapse views

Thanks to a new tool released by Google, NASA, the U.S. Geological Survey and Time magazine, the changes made to any location on Earth between 1984 and 2012 can be charted out.

As you can see above, the changes to Los Angeles aren’t all that drastic, but there are plenty crazy changes in other parts of the world:

For more info, check out TechNow’s coverage or go straight to the Google Earth Engine.

Photos: Google Earth Engine

clarincomhd:

Diferentes autos se reflejan en las ventanas de un edificio en Río de Janeiro, Brasil. Expertos e ingenieros de la industria dicen que los autos en Brasil son producidos con soldaduras defectuosas, escasos sistemas de seguridad e inferior calidad de materiales comparados con similares modelos hechos para EE.UU y Europa. (AP) 

clarincomhd:

Diferentes autos se reflejan en las ventanas de un edificio en Río de Janeiro, Brasil. Expertos e ingenieros de la industria dicen que los autos en Brasil son producidos con soldaduras defectuosas, escasos sistemas de seguridad e inferior calidad de materiales comparados con similares modelos hechos para EE.UU y Europa. (AP) 

ilustracaoportuguesa:

Ilustração Portugueza, No. 470, February 22 1915 - 24 on Flickr.

Carregar na imagem para ver em tamanho 1533 x 2309.
Propaganda pelos cartunistas das publicações Mucha e L’Europe Anti-Prussiene.

ilustracaoportuguesa:

Ilustração Portugueza, No. 470, February 22 1915 - 24 on Flickr.

Carregar na imagem para ver em tamanho 1533 x 2309.

Propaganda pelos cartunistas das publicações Mucha e L’Europe Anti-Prussiene.

createsomethingoriginal:

Picasso’s ‘light drawings’

Jujuzinha, um pouquinho de cultura romena para você pensar com mais carinho sobre Bucureşti

writersnoonereads:

“No one reads Nichita Stănescu” is a five word poem; it is a lament, my lament, but I need not cry it in his homeland of Romania. There, he is revered by everyone, and his poems are not merely read but prayed.

[The Romanian poet] Nichita Danilov recalls Stănescu being feted with an introduction suited for a demigod: “Remember, my friends. Take a good look at this man. He is a genius. Rejoice that you were able to meet him! That you lived at the same time as he did!”(SC, 307)

He was born on March 31, 1933, in Ploieşti. During WWII, the city’s groundbreaking oil refinery was taken over by the Nazis and eventually crippled by US bombers—“people dying in flames, the smell of burning everywhere, screaming, the indecent redness of split flesh” are some of the horrors that riddled through Stănescu’s childhood. His account of failing the first grade, because “he’d found it unusually difficult to imagine that the uttered utterance and the spoken speech exist and that they can be written”, serves as a good primer for his approach to poetry (“the ritual of writing on air”), and it describes a bewilderment toward language that every writer would benefit from experiencing and cultivating.

In 1952, Stănescu moved to Bucharest, where he studied Romanian, linguistics, philosophy, and literature. After university, he worked as an editor for various Romanian literary periodicals. His writings earned him the Herder Prize in 1975, and he was nominated for the 1979 Nobel Prize in Literature, which ended in the hands of Greek poet Odysseas Elytis—that same year, Max Frisch, Léopold Senghor, and Borges were also in contention.

Stănescu was a writer who preferred togetherness over solitude; he married three times, smoked, drank heavily, resided mainly in the houses of friends, and could be found extemporizing poems in bars with his audience eagerly scrambling to make transcriptions.

Gutenberg flattened words out, […] but words exist in space … Words are spatialized. They are not dead, like a book. They are alive, between me and you, me and you, me and you. They live; they are spoken, spaitialized, and received.(SC, 308)

During his fiftieth year of life, the long-suffered illness of his liver worsened, prompting a trip to the hospital. The doctor, while attempting to revive him, asked Stănescu if he could breathe. “I breathe”, he said, and those were his last words, written in air, written in pneuma: “am respira”.

He left behind a prodigious body of work that includes not only his diverse poetry, but also essays, and Romanian translations of the Serbian-language poets Adam Puslojic and Vasko Popa. Stănescu is a poet who “tears with [things’] tears”, because “[e]verything on earth[,] at one time or another needs to cry”, so he cries for the unable, for “the still unborn about the dead”, for Language, for the everyday.

He belongs in the same league as Rilke, Vallejo, Celan: poets for whom “poetry is [often] the weeping itself”; poets who do not simply play with words but, rather, who accumulate a poetic charge until it arcs out and brilliantly sears fresh paths through language—paths that become new homes for Being. His place is among those poets who truly embody the essence of poetry, that is, poeisis.

Collections of Stănescu’s poetry in English translation:

  • The Still Unborn About the Dead (Anvil Press, 1975), selected poems translated by Petru Popescu and Peter Jay. It is a shame that this collection is out-of-print, because it is the only one that contains the full Elegies (a.k.a. The Last Supper; originally Elegii, 1966), including “The Slit Man”, which Stănescu dedicated to Hegel and labelled the “anti-Elegy”, “a kind of Judas” to the eleven others.
  • Ask the Circle to Forgive You — Selected Poems, 1964-1979 (The Globe Press, 1983), translated by Mark Irwin and Mariana Carpinisan. In my opinion, this might not be the strongest of the out-of-print books, but it is worth tracking down just for “Contemplating the World from the Outside”. Thankfully, a lot of the other poems can be found via the later books, albeit in different translations.
  • Bas-Relief with Heroes — Selected Poems, 1960-1982 (Memphis State University Press, 1988), translated by Thomas C. Carlson and Vasile Poenaru, with illustrations by Benedict Gănescu. Its introductory essay by Dumitru Radu Popa provides an excellent overview of Stănescu and Romanian literature. The illustrations seem ill-suited, but the visual accompaniment is redeemed by a single, uncaptioned photograph (see above, third thumbnail) that is found near the end of the book, beside “Knot 19”. A handful of the poems from this collection can be found online at RomanianVoice.com.
  • Sentimental Story (Editura Athena, 1995), translated by Bogdan Ștefănescu. Unfortunately, I was not able to acquire a copy of this book, so I am not certain, but the Worldcat.org listing suggests they are English translations.
  • Occupational Sickness (BuschekBooks, 2005), selected and translated by Oana Avasilichioaei. You should get this book while it is still available; as of October 7, 2012, I still see copies for sale on Amazon.ca for ~$11. It contains a unique selection of poems, and she has beautiful translations of Stănescu’s lyrical verse. It is also the only completely bilingual edition that I know of. (The Carlson edition does include a few Romanian versions of the harder to translate poems.)
  • Wheel with a Single Spoke and Other Poems (Archipelago Books, 2012), selected and translated by Sean Cotter. Up until this glorious book, Bas-Relief with Heroes was the most extensive collection. Cotter and Archipelago have done English readers a great service. Feel free to start reading anywhere, but I suggest Cotter’s selections from Stănescu’s Egg and Sphere, Epica Magna, and Unwords.

With English translations of Stănescu’s poems back in circulation, now is the time for you English readers to embrace his words with your ribs: by breathing them in through your eyes, ears, skin.

“‘A poet is greater,’ [Stănescu] wrote, ‘when those that read him don’t discover the poet but themselves.”(OA, 10)

(Photos: please see their captions—unfortunately, I could not find credits for all of them, and there are a lot more photographs on the extremely popular Facebook page dedicated to Nichita Stănescu. Also, this article could not have been possible without the essays and translations, found in their respective collections, by Popescu, Irwin, Avasilichioaei, and Cotter; I noted, either in superscript or in tooltips, their initials and their book’s page number where appropriate.)

É impressão minha ou essa foto tem algo de muito tenebroso?

 ”LIFE photographer W. Eugene Smith’s children, Juanita and Patrick, walk hand-in-hand into a clearing in 1946. The photo was the closing image in Edward Steichen’s now-legendary 1955 MoMA exhibition, “The Family of Man”, and was one of the very first that Smith, wounded while working in the Pacific in World War II, made after the war”

É impressão minha ou essa foto tem algo de muito tenebroso?

 ”LIFE photographer W. Eugene Smith’s children, Juanita and Patrick, walk hand-in-hand into a clearing in 1946. The photo was the closing image in Edward Steichen’s now-legendary 1955 MoMA exhibition, “The Family of Man”, and was one of the very first that Smith, wounded while working in the Pacific in World War II, made after the war”

questionableadvice:

~ The Nervous Housewife, by Abraham Myerson, M.D., 1920

Isso em 1920! Antes do facebook!

questionableadvice:

~ The Nervous Housewife, by Abraham Myerson, M.D., 1920

Isso em 1920! Antes do facebook!

Roupa de homenzinho sério (Publicado com Instagram, no Shwe Hin Tha Condo)

Roupa de homenzinho sério (Publicado com Instagram, no Shwe Hin Tha Condo)

Roupinhas de Miguelito (Publicado com Instagram, no Shwe Hin Tha Condo)

Roupinhas de Miguelito (Publicado com Instagram, no Shwe Hin Tha Condo)

Minha Jujuzinha e meu Miguelzinho (Publicado com Instagram, no Pyay Road, 6 mile, Hlaing Township, Yangon)

Minha Jujuzinha e meu Miguelzinho (Publicado com Instagram, no Pyay Road, 6 mile, Hlaing Township, Yangon)

Noites Yangonitas 1 (Publicado com Instagram, no Pyay Road, 6 mile, Hlaing Township, Yangon)

Noites Yangonitas 1 (Publicado com Instagram, no Pyay Road, 6 mile, Hlaing Township, Yangon)

questionableadvice:

~ Beretta Minx, 1968via Vintage Ads LiveJournal“I am 22. And very petite. … You don’t have to be a big muscle man to pull back my slide”

Ah, que tempos lúdicos…

questionableadvice:

~ Beretta Minx, 1968
via Vintage Ads LiveJournal

“I am 22. And very petite. … You don’t have to be a big muscle man to pull back my slide”

Ah, que tempos lúdicos…

huffingtonpost:

arpeggia:

Animals in the Womb

They may grow to be very different beasts, but these breathtaking images reveal how surprisingly similar the beginning of life can be for the animal kingdom. Captured using revolutionary four-dimensional imaging technology and anatomically accurate models, scientists have managed to shed light on the world of mammals inside the womb. As diverse a bunch as they are - elephant, dog, dolphin and penguin are all shown united by their similar stages of development.

Scientists captured the images for a National Geographic Documentary called ‘Animals in the Womb’. The images were also used on a Channel 4 documentary ‘Animals in the Womb’ which aired in 2009. They were created by using a combination of ultrasound scans, computer graphics and small cameras -as well as some carefully created models- to document the animals’ development from conception to birth, and give an unparalleled glimpse into a world that few of us would ever expect to see.

[via dailymail.co.uk]

Wow. 

Texting Driver

Texting Driver

amandamolnar:

Sex and Propaganda

Germans series consisted of 16 leaflets that appeared to be the cover of Life Magazine on the front along with a sexy picture of a female, but on the back, the title “Death,” along with a skull wearing a helmet. The dates on the “Life” side all read November 1944” while the dates on the “Death” side all read “Doomsday 1944.” In some of the leaflets, the girl wears an American helmet; in others, she wears a British helmet.